Child modelling

Child modelling the questions you need to ask your self 

Child modelling can be hard work, but it can also be a wonderful experience for your child and a great opportunity for the two of you to spend time together. It can also introduce them to a new wealth of new experiences. Another big benefit it can develop your Childs social skills and self esteem, its wonderful for you to see a child grow into a vibrantly confident kid, they get to socialize with kids outside their normal social circle. It also helps them learn to speak to adults and take direction well. Children can expect to gain confidence, interview skills and wonderful memories. Plus if your child is successful in child modelling there is money to be made.

Your child must be photogenic, happy and smiley, with clear skin and bright eyes. However not all child models have to be pretty or cute sometimes a quirky look with plenty of character and sparkle will go a long way for advertising companies that want to sell their clients products. The childs temperament is equally as important as looks -all child and teen models must be good natured and sociable in order to put up with meeting lots of strangers and deal with a busy schedule.
Once you have established that your child has model potential, you will need to take the following steps
FOLLOW THESE 4 STEPS TO START
01.

Which modelling agencies .should you approach?

will go a long way for advertising companies that want to sell their clients products. The childs temperament is equally as important as looks -all child and teen models must be good natured and sociable in order to put up with meeting lots of strangers and deal with a busy schedule.
Once you have established that your child has model potential, you will need to take the following steps

02.

Key
.questions

What are the enrolment requirements and the total cost of joining? Often initial charges do not apply, but agencies will later require a basic professional portfolio. Enquire about their clients and their cut -this is usually circa 20%. It is imperative to fully understand their payment and contract terms before agreeing to them so read these thoroughly and ensure you are happy with the fine print. This is your chance to ask questions so don’t hold back. One thing to look for is whether you able to sign with other agencies. Child modelling is a highly competitive industry so tying yourself to only one can be stifling.

03.

Portfolio

Child modelling. When applying to an agency, you will only need
to provide a few simple snapshots. Just ensure they are clear, well lit and in focus. Include at least one close-up of the face. If the agency agrees to take your child onto their books, they will ask you to provide professional images which they can use to represent you on their website and to clients. The agency will be able to recommend a photographer either in house or externally. You can of course

04.

Missing school

In child modelling, A license is acquired from your local council in order for a school to give permission for your child to take part in the shoot or filming during term time. Although some agencies will obtain the license for you it is often the parents’ responsibility. Most councils take at least seven working days to process these. Letters are required from your doctor confirming your child is in good health and finally from your child’s school giving them permission of absence.

 

Castings

If your child gets a casting/audition, the agency will contact you. (Be sure to contact the agency from time-to-time to find out how many and what types of jobs they have been put forward for.) The agency will give you all the basic information for the casting, including date, time, place etc. also if there are wardrobe requirements or lines to be learnt. If your child has been shortlisted or successful, only then will the agency contact you to let you know. You may need to obtain a license for the shoot (see item 5 below). Once submitted you should then hear from your agency when your child has been confirmed, the rate and the details of location and call time for the shoot. In 1V commercials, if your child is featured in the final cut, they get what’s called a ‘Buyout’ – this is usage rights. Details of the ‘Buyout’ will no